UV Plus

100% protection against UV-A and UV-B rays.

UV Plus (UV410) Extra Protection

Most of the window films found selling in the market today has UV protection of only up to 380nm wavelength. You are still exposed to the most dangerous UV-A (315 – 400nm) radiation that cause skin cancer and other harmful side effects!

Besides UV-A, sunlight contains red, orange, yellow, green and blue light rays and many shades of each of these colours. The blue end of the light spectrum (400 – 410nm) contributes to retinal damage and leads to eye blindness. Our UV Plus feature has proven to protect 100% of UV radiation (up to UV-A) and blocks dangerous blue light rays from damaging the eyes.

Ultraviolet radiation (UV rays) are divided into three segments based on wavelengths, UV-C (100 – 280nm), UV-B (280 – 315nm) and UV-A (315 – 400nm). UV-A is the most dangerous UV that causes skin cancer and other harmful side effects.

UV-C rays are short wavelength and do not reach the earth’s surface.

UV-B rays make up about 5-10% of the rays that reach us:
•    Affects the skin’s outer layer.
•    Primary cause of sunburns, skin cancer, premature skin aging, and tanning.

UV-A rays constitute approximately 90-95% of the rays that reach the Earth:
•    Weaker than UVB rays, but penetrate deep into the skin’s layers.
•    Contribute to signs of sunburns, skin cancer, premature skin aging such as wrinkles, as well as tanning.

Background

Understanding UV

How UV works and what it does.

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UV rays & their effect on skin

Sunlight contains red, orange, yellow, green and blue light rays and many shades of each of these colours. The blue end of the light spectrum (400 – 410nm) contributes to retinal damage and leads to eye blindness.

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What is blue light?

Blue light has a very short wavelength, and so produces a higher amount of energy. The blue end of the light spectrum (400 – 410nm) penetrates all the way to the retina (the inner lining of the back of the eye) and contributes to retinal damage and leads to eye blindness.